Welding Symbols

A Brief Introduction to Welding Symbols

 

Welding Symbols

Welding Symbols

Welding calls for an exact execution, which is the reason why welders follow a diagram of welding symbols. These welding symbols, which were put together by the American Welding Society, instruct where and how the welds are supposed to be created.

 

Before going into actual work, potential welders go through extensive training on welding symbols. They are taught how to read and write welding symbols so that when they work on actual welding projects, they can execute the job with exact precision. Welding symbols are generally easy to understand, although it will take several days of training to fully learn how to read them.

 

Welding symbols begin with a reference line. It is a straight horizontal line to which other symbols are connected. An arrow is placed on either side of the reference line to indicate the joint to weld. There are several combinations of reference line and arrow, which vary according to how the weld should be made. The location of the arrow is very crucial, as it becomes the definitive point of the weld.

 



Other than the reference line and arrow, welding symbols also include a tail. This is not usually part of welding diagrams but is often used when putting additional specifications. Welding diagrams also often show a circle. This is a symbol for “welding all around” and is one of the symbols that are often taken note of.

 

Welding symbols might be a little confusing to learn at first, but there are several training programs that can help welders better understand welding symbols. There are also resources on the Internet today. Copies of welding diagrams, for example, are widely available on the Internet, which can be used in practice readings. These are available at no charge. Welding websites and books also prove to be a good help to novice welders.